Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Reading Time Management

We are all busy. We all have a million things to do and (seemingly) not enough time to get them all done. We all say at some point: "I wish I had more hours in the day!"

Well, I got news for y'all: there are only 24 hours in a day, and that's not going to change any time soon. Instead of wishing for more time, we should try to make better use of the 24 hours that we already have. But that's easy to say and harder still to do. How to start the process?

I began my quest to better time management by identifying activities that I engage in on a daily basis that might be wasteful. And the number one activity by far was driving a car to and from work every day. Think about it: all you can do when you drive a car is DRIVE THE CAR. You can't do anything else effectively and that includes such activities as putting on makeup, trimming your nails, or checking emails on your laptop or smartphone. Attempting to "multi task" while driving is a waste of time at best and potentially deadly at worst.

So what if public transportation is not an option for you and you must drive to work every day. How can you make better use of that time? Three words: books on tape. Now know as audio books, these have made my daily commute much more entertaining and informative. Give them a try for your daily commute and you might be amazed to discover how much you enjoy the experience.

4 comments:

Alison said...

Amen to that. I also heartily recommend podcasts for the same purpose. My iPod is now loaded up almost exclusively with Marketplace, Talk of the Nation, and This American Life, and playing them in the car makes that hour+ drive each way a lot more pleasant. Also, they're free!

Jamison said...

I don't have any idea about the 'books on tape'.How to use these for better time management?

Karen Funk Blocher said...

I don't have long commutes or a working car stereo, so this doesn't apply to me. But when I drive to Los Angeles (about an 8 hour trip each way), I rents a car and typically bring spoken word CDs, or else find an old time radio station on satellite. We used to bring Douglas Adams books on tape, but one seldom sees cassette players in cars anymore. Time to buy Adams in another medium, I guess!

Nguyen Duc said...

nice blog